EFT

During her hypnotherapy sessions, Kay Heatherly also incorporates the Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) as an adjunct treatment to hypnotherapy.

Doorways within doorways in a homeShe has developed her own variation of EFT based on the needs of her clients and its ease of use with hypnotherapy. She calls it the “RELEASE! Method of EFT”.

Learning How To Let Go Of The Past

  • EFT releases negative thoughts or emotions that disrupt the balance of the body’s energy system.
  • EFT is a technique that is based on ancient Tibetan/Chinese knowledge for clearing the body’s major energy meridians to rebalance body and mind.
  • EFT is used during the session and at home as well working with the client’s personalized audio mp3 recording.

Where did EFT come from? When was EFT first used?

In 1979, psychologist Roger Callahan devised a treatment called Thought Field Therapy to cure people of fears and phobias by tapping on various meridian points on the body. Historically, this was first achieved with a client called Mary who was instantly cured of a water phobia when she tapped under her eye. Later Gary Craig, an engineer from Stanford and a student of Dr. Callahan, went further by simplifying the therapy, making it more accessible and calling it the Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT).

As an EFT practitioner, Kay has found that the RELEASE! Method that has proved extremely effective in helping her clients let go of their negativity that has accumulated in the body and in the mind. The RELEASE! Method has been especially helpful to students with test anxiety or fears of taking tests.

The Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) is capable of dramatically relieving many symptoms, often working within minutes and producing long-lasting results. Some examples in which EFT is highly effective from an experienced EFT practitioner include relieving, minimizing, or eliminating:

  • Chronic pain, headaches, migraines, and arthritis
  • Addictive cravings for food or cigarettes
  • Anxiety or panic attacks
  • Compulsions and obsessions
  • Fears and phobias
  • Grief and loss
  • Insomnia
  • Negative or obsessive thoughts and memories
  • Test anxiety about taking the SAT, ACT, GRE, LSAT, MCAT, Bar Exam, etc.
  • Fears about sports performance.